Tyra and Her Transition

Kathy and Angel;

Thank you both for the care and love you gave to Tyra during her visits to the clinic.

It was with your help and care that she was able to complete the last part of her journey here on earth with such grace and high energy.

Her passing and the days leading up to her passing were carefully crafted to ensure that she had all the experiences that she needed to expand and grow to the fullest extent that this incarnation would allow. Perhaps even more!

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Kathy and Angel;

Thank you both for the care and love you gave to Tyra during her visits to the clinic.

It was with your help and care that she was able to complete the last part of her journey here on earth with such grace and high energy.

Her passing and the days leading up to her passing were carefully crafted to ensure that she had all the experiences that she needed to expand and grow to the fullest extent that this incarnation would allow. Perhaps even more!

I was truly amazing to see how the events unfolded and honored to be a witness to it all.

Tyra came full circle and completed her earthly life with an A+. Even on the day of her passing everything was so complete. I have never felt so at ease with letting a Dog go as I was with Tyra. Although some sadness was involved it was also very beautiful and I really felt that everything was completed perfectly. Tyra was amazing and I know this life experience changed her and through her passing I was also changed. It was like a gift was given back to me. I can't explain it any better that that.

So as you both played a vital role in her completion I just wanted to say Thank You once more. Tyra thanks you as well. Also Thank you for the card you sent.

I am sure we will see both you again.

Tyra, Rokko and Me.

A Cat Named Dog with Lipidosis

The story we would like to share is about our sick cat named ‘Dog’. He is a 10 year old domestic shorthair and a beloved member of our family.

Our ordeal began in 2015, shortly before Halloween. We started to notice that our normally healthy, although obese (over 20 lbs.), cat was losing weight. At first we were happy Dog was slimming down because he really did need to lose some pounds. However, when he couldn't jump onto the bathroom counter to drink water the way he loved to, we became concerned and took him to our regular veterinarian.

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The story we would like to share is about our sick cat named ‘Dog’. He is a 10 year old domestic shorthair and a beloved member of our family.

Our ordeal began in 2015, shortly before Halloween. We started to notice that our normally healthy, although obese (over 20 lbs.), cat was losing weight. At first we were happy Dog was slimming down because he really did need to lose some pounds. However, when he couldn't jump onto the bathroom counter to drink water the way he loved to, we became concerned and took him to our regular veterinarian.

Our veterinarian’s suggested we run some blood work to rule out something common, i.e. the possibility that Dog might be diabetic. When the results finally came back, they showed that Dog did not have diabetes and aside from having a higher than normal thyroid level, everything looked fine. The recommendation was to give Dog an antibiotic shot for possible infection?? He also suggested to put him on a Hills prescription Diet and told us to syringe feed a couple times a day, to give him some extra calories. This was on October 10th, he weighed 16.8 lbs.

Dog seemed to be improving and was holding his own. We started giving him some canned cat food, which he seemed to like. Normally, Dog is dry kibble cat and won't eat anything else, even tuna. It was during this time, I noticed my husband had bought a different brand of cat food than we normally buy. I asked him to go back to the store and get our regular brand, but the damage had already been done. In my opinion, this change of brand food caused Dog to stop eating all together and our nightmare began.

The week of Thanksgiving, we began to notice Dog wasn't eating the canned food or the dry food any more. We made plans to visit relatives over the holidays, so we made some arrangements for a friend to come by and syringe feed Dog at least once a day because he would not eat otherwise. We were almost sure we might come home to find out Dog didn’t make it and either had to be put down or passed on his own. However, when we did get home we found Dog was still holding on and this is when we decided to take him to a different veterinarian for a second opinion.

The new veterinarian’s office requested for us to bring Dogs medical records with us to our appointment, including the results of the blood test taken in October. During our appointment, the new veterinarian noticed our regular veterinarian wrote Hepatic Lipidosis on one of the pages. The recommendation form this new veterinarian was to redo the blood work for comparison. We were so nervous because some online research showed Hepatic Lipidosis was basically a death sentence, if you could not get the cats to eat. After a few days, we finally got the news…Dog did indeed have Hepatic Lipidosis. The veterinarian’s recommendation was to place a feeding tube. The beginning cost would be roughly $1,100 for the tube and anything else that may come up during and after surgery. The second option was to put Dog to sleep.

After much thought, we decided we would not put Dog through getting a feeding tube. We also stopped syringe feeding him as well because we didn’t feel like we should be forcing Dog to do something he clearly didn’t want to do. The decision was made to let Dog pass away at home, surrounded by the family that loved him so much. However, once we got him home he was sitting on our bed and he turned and gave me this look of 'so what ya going to with me' and to be honest we had no idea. The one thing I did know that if Dog was not going to give up then I was not going to give up on him, so I began searching online for help.

I found some great websites that contain a lot of great information, i.e. healthypets.mercola.com and catinfo.com. I also went to the pet store with the CATFOOD COMPOSITION chart from catinfo.com and bought a can of each of the highest calorie food they had; most over 100kcals per can. Some of the foods were easy to syringe and others you couldn't without a blender. Dog hated them ALL. The only food he seemed to give in to was when we used Beachnuts beef baby food. Then I found a health pet food store in Riverdale. I figured they might be able to help figure out a high calorie food that Dog might tolerate.

SO for the next several months, this became my recipe. My recipe consisted of: 4 nuggets of Primal raw turkey formula defrosted a jar of Beechnut beef baby food, a can of Natural Balance original Ultra Kitten Formula, 2 regular size cubes of bone broth melted, and 10 drops of licorice extract. Plus, once we found Dr. Backus we added in 2 tsp. of Wei Ling Tang, and approximately 30 to 40 ml. of unflavored Pedialyte and water for 60 to 80 ml of fluids total in a day. I'd try to feed him 9 to 15 ml. every 3 hrs. However, this was not sustainable for long term.
By Christmas, Dog was alive and comfortable, but he had no energy and no strength in his back legs. We knew if we didn’t try something else and soon we were going to lose him. This is when we found Dr. Backus and made an appointment.

Dr. Backus went through Dogs medical history with us and was very thorough. She was very honest with us and gave us a few recommendations. 1) Was to do a cancer screen to make sure we weren't fighting a losing battle. 2) Was to get a feeding tube placed. We were still unsure about the feeding tube and to be honest my husband was against it. We explained to Dr. Backus about the quote we got of $1,100 we got from our normal veterinarian and she said the expense should not be that much, more like $400-$500, and we should get more estimates. 3) Was to do some rectal ozone treatments. By the end of the appointment, we agreed to all 3.
By mid-January, the feedings were really starting to wear on us and Dog seemed to be gradually losing ground. I began to call around to other veterinary offices to see if their prices for a feeding tube would be more reasonable then our first quote. We finally found a place that would do the surgery for around $200 and we went for it.

Dog had some touch and go moments and a rough recovery, but our little man pulled through. The feeding tube made everything much easier for us and Dog. At the time of surgery, Dog was down to 8 lbs. and if you remember he once was 20 lbs. For our surgery checkup appointment, we found out Dog was slowing gaining some of his weight back. This was a relief to us.

Dog had his feeding tube for a total of 24 days and started EATING on his own. The veterinarian that performed the surgery recommended we take the tube out because Dog was doing so well. He now weighs a little over 10 lbs. and we understand this will be a slow process, but things are looking up for our little fighter. We never gave up on him and he never gave up on us.

Thank you Dr. Backus for your time and honesty regarding Dog’s health. You are the reason we moved forward with the feeding tube. The time you took to explain the procedure and benefits is why Dog is still with us.

Willow, Chuck, Dog, Kit (Dogs brother, same litter), and Spade (our oldest cat).

Sam's Hyperthyroidism

Our cat Sam was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism just over two years ago, when he was 13. He had been slowing down quite a bit and he was living pretty much downstairs, near the cat box and food, not venturing upstairs, and sleeping most of the time. The sleeping, of course, is not unusual for cats, but we really thought that he was on his way out.

We tried a couple of natural supplements, there were some slight positive results and and he was beginning to resist the supplements. We didn’t want to try medications with all of their side effects. About four months ago, we made the difficult decision to withdraw treatment and let nature take its course.

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Our cat Sam was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism just over two years ago, when he was 13. He had been slowing down quite a bit and he was living pretty much downstairs, near the cat box and food, not venturing upstairs, and sleeping most of the time. The sleeping, of course, is not unusual for cats, but we really thought that he was on his way out.

We tried a couple of natural supplements, there were some slight positive results and and he was beginning to resist the supplements. We didn’t want to try medications with all of their side effects. About four months ago, we made the difficult decision to withdraw treatment and let nature take its course.

However, even though we discontinued the supplements, we decided to change his food. We bought the very high quality foods that are carried at the Animal Park store in Riverdale. We gradually introduced them as we phased out the previous “highest quality” foods from Petco. We also greatly reduced the fish content in his dry food and eliminated it altogether from his canned food.

About two months into this change, Sam became much more active and responsive – and he now spends much more time upstairs and with us. His recent physical shows that he has maintained his weight and his thyroid gland has softened and is more normal in shape. Great news for our now 15 year-old Sweet Sam!

We feel very strongly that the quality of food has a huge effect on the quality of life our pets lead. For years we have been feeding grain free foods and our previous pets have lived long and healthy lives, but the better quality seems to have really turned the corner. It’s so great to have that kind of time with our pets!

Thank you for all the support,

The Rall Family